Doors and Windows

Doors and Windows

Most of you know I am a big fan of Instagram, in fact I know some of my readers have found my blog via Instagram. Nearly all the photos I post there are birds and nature subjects which seem to be well received. If you think Instagram is all food shots and stoopy celebrities, they are there too, but a lot of very good photography shows up in the feeds. I follow a variety photographers and groups for inspiration.

Some Instagram galleries are eclectic, but most serious photographers seem to focus on one area. Urbex or minimalism or landscapes or sky shots, even colors or fantasy edits. One of my favorites is luckycharmsandbeer who has a huge following for her cows and farm animal photos. Her quirky sense of humor is a big draw as well. 

One intriguing group I follow is Rsa_DoorsandWindows. Occasionally I post and tag an interesting photo to the group. But, my followers prefer the nature shots. So, what to do with those interesting doors and windows I do find?

Why, share them with you, my loyal readers.

Doorway to catastrophes?  Sony A77 II with DT 16-50mm 1/320 sec. f/3.5 ISO 400 EV -0.7

Doorway to catastrophes? 

Sony A77 II with DT 16-50mm 1/320 sec. f/3.5 ISO 400 EV -0.7

This plain door puzzled me. Did they respond to catastrophes? Or cause catastrophes? And why would you need a giant ash tray next to the door? No real sign or hours posted or even a peep hole. Well, Mr. Google is so smart as my mom used to say. The Catastrophic Theater is an "ensemble-based theatre company dedicated to creating a meaningful exchange between artists and audiences through the creation and performance of new work of all sorts". 

Now you know. Me, I was just wandering around some warehouses near downtown Houston and thought the door was cool.

Our famous Esperson building Sony A77 II with DT 16-50mm 1/320 sec. f/5.6 ISO 200 

Our famous Esperson building

Sony A77 II with DT 16-50mm 1/320 sec. f/5.6 ISO 200 

Maybe the windows aren't all that fantastic, but this gives me an opportunity to show off our only example of Italian Renaissance architecture in downtown Houston. This crowns the Esperson building built in 1927. Mellie Esperson had this constructed and named for her husband Neils, an early oil and real estate tycoon. The tempietto (def: a small temple especially one of ornamental character) holds its own among the newer, towering buildings downtown. It is lit at night. 

Wouldn't you love a front porch like this? But the house didn't come with air conditioning.  Sony A77 II with DT 16-50mm 1/400 sec. f/2.8 ISO 200 

Wouldn't you love a front porch like this? But the house didn't come with air conditioning. 

Sony A77 II with DT 16-50mm 1/400 sec. f/2.8 ISO 200 

Heritage Square is maintained by the Texas City Historical Association and has three preserved Victorian residences. I believe this one is called the Engineer's home; I will have to stop by next time and be sure. 

These are lovely houses with high ceilings and tall windows for streaming light. Reminds me of a bed and breakfast I stayed in on my East Texas trip a few years ago. The Magnolia Street Inn was a fun place; check it out if you are in that area. 

Corner office Sony A77 II with DT 16-50mm 1/640 sec. f/6.3 ISO 1000

Corner office

Sony A77 II with DT 16-50mm 1/640 sec. f/6.3 ISO 1000

I still have a lot of photos of the warehouse I visited last fall. This one has been post-processed with Fractalius and Topaz Simplify. It was such a great place for shapes and textures and I have used them in a lot of Time Travel and mashups. And I worked a long time on a montage but it just didn't come together. I will keep at it.

Some photo art images are on my Flickr page, and check out my fave photographer, Bill Maroldo's Flickr account as well. 

Wonder what the missing lights looked like?  Sony A77 II with DT 16-50mm 1/640 sec. f/3.2 ISO 200 

Wonder what the missing lights looked like? 

Sony A77 II with DT 16-50mm 1/640 sec. f/3.2 ISO 200 

On one of the urban exploration adventures last fall when it was too sunny for birds, I found this old Houston Lighting & Power substation facility. The company has long since been renamed Reliant Energy but it was our electric company and ... my first job.

In 1967, I was the first female hired in the engineering office since WWII. I learned to draw with ink on linen and to keep the company's distribution maps updated. No, they weren't ahead of their time with women's issues; it was the height of the Vietnam War and most of the young men were subject to the draft. 

Metal windows Sony A77 II with DT 16-50mm 1/250 sec. f/5.6 ISO 400 

Metal windows

Sony A77 II with DT 16-50mm 1/250 sec. f/5.6 ISO 400 

And during one of my wanderings around Rosenberg I took this photo. I think those are weeds in front of the metal windows, but look closely and there are vines and foliage inside the building. This little brick structure was on the Railroad Museum property; I have no idea what was inside.

Or how the vines have enough light to grow. 

Door at the Katy Rice Mill Sony A77 II with DT 16-50mm HDR. f/5.6 ISO 200 

Door at the Katy Rice Mill

Sony A77 II with DT 16-50mm HDR. f/5.6 ISO 200 

Katy, Texas is a community on the far west side of Houston. Old Katy still has the Rice Mill near the MKT railroad which was the main economy until they learned to grow McMansions for the people working in Houston. 

Once someone's home Sony A77 II with 70-400mm G2 1/250 sec. f/5.6 ISO 1000 

Once someone's home

Sony A77 II with 70-400mm G2 1/250 sec. f/5.6 ISO 1000 

And this is a back door from some Texas City apartments I showed you in A Trip to Texas City without Birds. The marker to the left shows "39". I keep thinking working families lived in these apartments. If you peek inside, you can imagine how life could have been. 

What is behind the green door? Tell them Joe sent me.... Sony A77 II with 70-400mm G2 1/81600 sec. f/5.6 ISO 1000

What is behind the green door? Tell them Joe sent me....

Sony A77 II with 70-400mm G2 1/81600 sec. f/5.6 ISO 1000

Another door from those Texas City apartments. I think this one was to part of the laundry room or maybe a storeroom; then again.... who knows? Some of you may remember the song from the 50s (warning sound clip) The Green Door. Maybe mysterious happenings or just old paint cans and rusted lawn equipment? 

This isn't a conventional door, but something I found while prowling around in the older part of downtown Houston. It is a curb storm drain inlet made by the East Jordan Iron Works with a gentle reminder that all doors lead somewhere. 

Do you have an interesting front door on your house? Have you ever been to an event at The Catastrophe? Do you have corner office with windows where you work? Let me know in the comments. 

Random Adventures: White Bird; Seeing Double and Triple; Rockport Beach and Rookery 

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In Search of Sandhill Cranes

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Randy Clapper Rails